Browsing Category

A Love Story

A Love Story, Marketing

Memoir Appeals to a Broad Audience

When I began writing, Watching Their Dance, a nonfiction story, I wanted to appeal to a broad audience.  After educating myself and reading about marketing a book, I realized I needed to narrow my focus first on the audience that I was pretty sure the story would appeal to.  That audience was the Huntington’s disease community.  Once you have success with that audience, then you begin to branch out to another audience.  

Here’s the truth: When you write for everyone, you write for no one.   https://goinswriter.com/writing-tip-be-specific/ 

My biggest supporters, the HD community,  did and still do support me and now I’m branching out to other audiences who might enjoy my book.  The first audience I’m focusing on are readers who like love stories; the second audience are folks who like to read about a person/family overcoming a tremendous challenge in their life.

 Marika Jaegers, HOPES Project Co-Leader & Student Researcher, who reviewed the book, said this:  

“Watching Their Dance offers a wide range of insight into living at risk for Huntington’s, living with Huntington’s, and caring for someone with Huntington’s. It is a worthwhile read for a broad audience: those affected by Huntington’s Disease, those curious about the disease, or those who know nothing of the disease but wish to read a captivating and insightful memoir.”  Stanford Literature-Corner

Therese’s memoir/nonfiction book, Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s, is available on her author website  http://www.theresecrutchermarin.com   & on Amazon, B&N, & in Kindle, Kobo, Nook, iBooks format.

100% of the proceeds from Therese’s book sold in the U.S. will be donated to HDSA.  http://www.hdsa.org     Last December, Therese and John donated $9,015.00 to HDSA that was the profit from book sales since Therese published in April 2017.

We Can Never Lose HOPE………..

#LetsTalkAboutHD      #WeCanNeverLoseHOPE     

#HDSAFamily    #HDSTRONG

 

A Love Story

Writing Your Story to Heal

John and I have just returned home from the Huntington’s Disease Society of America (HDSA) Convention in Los Angeles, California where I promoted my book, Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s.  Author Website: http://www.theresecrutchermarin.com

The question I get asked most often when I interact with folks is, “Why did you decide to write a book?”  My reply is, “The motive was purely selfish because I was looking a way to heal from the loss of my three sisters-in-law to the cruelest disease on the planet; Huntington’s disease”.  Article:  The Healing Power of Telling Your Story 

In 2008, Cindy, my third sister-in-law passed away and in 2010, I began writing my story.  A counselor I’d seen for years suggested I write a book as a way to heal.  Seven years later, in 2017, I held a book in my hands and could honestly say, “the process of writing my story, validated what I had gone through, and allowed me to move the grief I harbored to the pages of the book; so, yes, I have healed”.  

Article on Benefits of Writing:   Writing About Emotions May Ease Stress and trauma  

We Can Never Lose Hope

A Love Story

Memoir Receives Excellent Book Review from Stanford University

           MAY IS HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE AWARENESS MONTH!

HOPES Book Review (Huntington’s Outreach Project for Education, at Stanford University)   HOPES website

    “Huntington’s was first known as Huntington’s chorea, as in choreography, the Greek word for dance. The term chorea describes how people affected with the disorder writhe, twist, and turn in a constant, uncontrollable dancelike motion. It is a hereditary, degenerative brain disorder for which there is no effective treatment or cure.”

     –Watching Their Dance, pp. 11

     In one life-altering moment, Therese Crutcher-Marin learned that the man she loved and his three beloved sisters were at risk for one of the most devastating genetic diseases: Huntington’s Disease. In Watching Their Dance, Crutcher-Marin recounts her journey of love, uncertainty, loss, and strength in the face of Huntington’s Disease. She tells a vivid and personal story of the experience of loving someone at risk for Huntington’s Disease, meticulously sharing the details of her fears, the symptoms of the disease itself, the care-partner experience, and the loss that inevitably comes with Huntington’s. Thrown into the wildly unsteady and frightening path of Huntington’s, Crutcher-Marin returns repeatedly to the mantra, “nothing is certain in life.”

     Crutcher-Marin weaves in details of her personal struggle with uncertainty, a daunting challenge for a woman averse to taking risks. She skillfully captures the awkwardness and difficulty in breaching the subject of Huntington’s with loved ones, and expresses a deeply personal account of her anxiety and suspicion as she worries that she can see the beginning of Huntington’s symptoms in her husband and friends. The book shows the diverse ways in which Huntington’s Disease can manifest itself in daily life to affect both patients and their care partners.

By Marika Jaeger 07 Jan, 2018 Nonfictional Literature

To read the full review on Stanford’s website please go to: “Watching Their Dance” by Therese Crutcher-Marin

HOPES FB Page   https://www.facebook.com/hopesstanford/ 

We Can Never Lose HOPE………………….            

Therese’s memoir/nonfiction book, Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s, is available on her author website  http://www.theresecrutchermarin.com   & on Amazon, B&N, & in Kindle, Kobo, Nook, iBooks format.

100% of the proceeds from Therese’s book sold in the U.S. will be donated to HDSA.  http://www.hdsa.org     Therese and John donated $9,015.00 to HDSA that is the profit from book sales since Therese published in April 2017.

#LetsTalkAboutHD #HDAwarenessMonth

A Love Story

Chapter 4-Walking Away

Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s

Excerpt from Chapter 4-Walking Away-page 42

“Therese, it’s Sue.” Sue was a college friend who worked in the women’s-accessories office.  “Are you sitting down? This is terrible.  You’re not going to believe it.”

“What? What happened?’

Between sobs, Sue said, “Heather’s husband got on a plane in Chicago to come home from his business trip, and it crashed just after takeoff.  He died.”

My hand went over my mouth. “Oh, my God!” I rocked back in my chair, feeling as if I’d been punched in the stomach.

“Hello, hello.  Are you still there, Therese?”

“Yes, yes, I’m here. Oh, how horrible!” Now I started to cry. Poor Heather! They were such a happy couple.  They had their whole life ahead of them!” My brown furrowed as I heard familiar words escaping my mouth. “I guess you never know what’s going to happen in life.”

As I groped in a drawer for a tissue, Jerry patted my should, packed up his ties, and said he’d call me next week.  The assistants quickly gathered in Sue’s office, where she had a small TV. The newscaster said, “American Airlines Flight 191 took from O’Hare International Airport in Chicago at eleven a.m., and moments later, it crashed.  Two hundred and fifty-eight died, along with thirteen crew-members and two people on the ground.  An investigation by the FAA will begin tomorrow.

The rest of the afternoon was a blur.  The whole buying office was quiet, with none of the buzz usually heard throughout the department.  Trying to get some work done, I looked down at my desk pad and found you never know what’s going to happen in life written all over it.  The words stared back at me as I attempted to read the secret lying between the lines.”

Therese’s memoir/nonfiction book, Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s, is available on her author website  http://www.theresecrutchermarin.com   & on Amazon, B&N, & in Kindle, Kobo, Nook, iBooks format.

100% of the proceeds from books purchased in the U.S. is being donated to Huntington’s Disease Society of America (HDSA).

 Subscribe to Therese’s Blog via Email

 Enter your email address to subscribe to Therese’s blog and receive notifications of new posts by email and receive the first chapter of her book, Watching Their Dance, via email.

 

 

 

 

A Love Story

Kirkus Review-“Watching Their Dance”

A debut memoir focuses on a family wrestling with the genetic legacy of Huntington’s disease.

1976

Crutcher-Marin met her future husband in 1976 while they both attended junior college in California—it took no time for her to be captivated by him. Then, a few weeks before Thanksgiving, John’s three sisters called a meeting and revealed that while visiting an aunt they discovered the family was plagued by Huntington’s disease, a debilitating neurological disorder. John’s mother, Phyllis, and three of her siblings—four out of six overall—suffered from it. The odds that John would eventually come down with it were about 1 in 2, and there was neither a test to definitively diagnose it nor a cure to combat it. When the author met John he was 21 years old, and, generally, the symptoms start to appear between the ages of 30 and 45. Overwhelmed by the prospect that such uncertainty would forever haunt their lives, Crutcher-Marin reluctantly left John, a move encouraged by her own family. She even briefly dated someone else. But she couldn’t bear the separation and eventually returned to his embrace; they wed in 1980 and had a child. But the threat continued to loom over them like a storm cloud, and two of John’s siblings did eventually grapple with, and die from, the terrible affliction. This is a story more about the power of hope than the wages of Huntington’s—a pre-symptomatic test for the disease eventually hit the market, but John refused to take it. As he explained: “I’d rather live my life with the hope I don’t have the mutated gene than find out I do.” Crutcher-Marin writes affectingly about the way her marriage was actually fortified by its precariousness—she learned to love more deeply in the shadow of her husband’s mortality. She also tenderly portrays the plight of his sisters—beleaguered not only by the deadly genetic inheritance, but also difficult childhoods stained by loneliness and abandonment. This is a rare treat—a true story that is as uplifting as it is heartbreaking.

A poignant remembrance of a love forged in crisis.      

kirkusreviews.com    Amazon Author Central website    http://amazon.com/author/theresecrutchermarin

Therese’s memoir/nonfiction book, Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s, is available on her author website  http://www.theresecrutchermarin.com   & on Amazon, B&N, & in Kindle, Kobo, Nook, iBooks format.   100% of the proceeds from Therese’s book is being donated to Huntington’s Disease organizations around the world. 

Enter your email address to subscribe to Therese’s blog and receive notifications of new posts by email and receive the first chapter of my book, Watching Their Dance, via email.

 

 

A Love Story, Family

Excerpt from “Watching Their Dance”

Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’sChapter 17……………….

“On March 1, 1986, Big John drove his daughter to University of  California San Francisco Medical Center.  I’d been worrying about the Marin siblings for eight years, though it felt more like fifty, and many times I’d just wanted to flee.  This was one of them.  I dreamed of escaping with John and Keith into a world that had no illness, no genetic disease, where we could live happily ever after.  But that was a fairy tale.  The reality was–and I had no doubt–that Marcia had HD.  My fear was almost consuming me, but, of course, it was nothing compared to what Marcia must have been feeling.  UCSF Huntington’s Clinic

The neurologists at the medical center had a rating system, which they used clinically and in research, to evaluate a patient’s motor, cognitive, behavioral, and functional abilities on a scale from zero to four, four being the most severe dysfunction.  Marcia would be evaluated in fifteen areas, among them gait, tandem walking, rigidity in arms, tongue protrusion, and ocular pursuit.  

John called that evening to find out how it went, but she didn’t say much, only that the doctors would call with the results in three weeks.  He tried to be upbeat, but you could tell it was a hard conversation.  Even Big John was at a loss for words. Once again, I wished with all my heart that I could simply stop time, so that no more cells in Marcia and Lora’s brains would die and they wouldn’t have to experience any more pain or sorrow.  And that way, HD could never find my love.”

We can never lose HOPE………..Therese

100% of the proceeds from Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s, a memoir/nonfiction book, is being donated to Huntington’s disease organizations around the world.

To purchase the book, go to Therese’s website:  http://www.theresecrutchermarin.com and Amazon    B&N     Kindle     Kobo      Nook 

A Love Story

A Precarious Life

The Kirkus reviewer of Watching Their Dance: Three Sisters, a Genetic Disease and Marrying into a Family At Risk for Huntington’s,  wrote the following regarding my book.           

“Crutcher-Marin writes affectingly about the way her marriage was actually fortified by its precariousness—she learned to love more deeply in the shadow of her husband’s mortality.”

Many folks don’t know how rare Huntington’s disease is, $30,000 people in the U.S. have the disease, and the second fact unknown to many is that approximately 250,000 people live AT RISK.  So, what does that mean? It means those 250,000 had a parent with Huntington’s disease and they have a 50/50 chance of inheriting it. https://www.wehaveaface.org/    https://help4hd.org/           http://www.hdsa.org  

John and his three sisters, Lora, Marcia and Cindy were AT RISK since their mom had HD.  The five of us traveled a precarious road in the shadow of Huntington’s disease, not knowing when and who Huntington’s would attack.

 

We can never lose HOPE…………………………Therese

To purchase Therese’s memoir, an inspirational story of hope and love, please go to   http://www.theresecrutchermarin.com